People of Detroit

Some of the people of Detroit during French rule (1701-1760).

Guilleaume Aguet
Arnault
Baby
Pierre Bassinet
Antoine Beauregard
Guillaume Beranger
Jean Baptiste Henry Beranger
Francois Bienvenu dit de L'Isle
Andre Bombardie
Francois Bonne
Etienne Bontran
Francois Bouat
Louis Bourbon
Guillaume Bovet dit Deliard
Francois Brunet
Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac
Francois Cadillac
Jacques Cadillac
Jean Antoine Cadillac
Joseph Cadillac
Judith Cadillac
Magdelene Cadillac
Marianne Cadillac
Marie Agathe Cadillac
Marie Therese Cadillac
Marie Therese (Guyon) Cadillac
Pierre Denis Cadillac
Rene Louis Cadillac
Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac (II)
Jacques Campau
Michel Campau
Jean Casse
Catherine Eury (de Parelle) Celoron
Helen Picote (de Belestre) Celoron
Jean Baptiste Celoron
Marie Madeleine (Blondeau) Celoron
Marie Madeleine Celoron
Pierre Joseph Celoron
Pierre Chantelon
Charconacle (Chacornacle?)
Pierre Francois Xavier Charlevoix
Andre Chauvet
Louis Antoine Chenonvoizon (Cheauonvouzon?)
Pierre Chesne
Robert Chevalier de Beauchene
Jean Baptiste Chornic
Francois Clairambault
Bonnaventure Compien dit L'Esperance
Antoine Crozat
D'Argenteuil
Ruette D'Auteuil
Jacques Pierre Daneau
Touissaints Dardennes
de Beauharnois


Louis de Buade
Hector Louis de Callieres
Bartholomey de Gregoire

de la Epinay

Dominique de la Marche
Louis de la Porte
de la Rane
Armand de la Richardie

Jean Fafard de Lorme
Jacob de Marsac (de Cobrion?)
Jacob de Marsac dit Desrocher
Catherine (Daillebout) de Noyan
Pierre Louis de Noyan
Pierre Jacques Payan de Noyan
Jeanne de Pechagut
Claude de Ramezay
Philippe de Rigaud
Jean Baptist de St. Ours
Marguerite (La Guardeur) de St. Ours
Alphonse de Tonty
Marianne (la Marque) de Tonty
Marie-Anne (Picote de Belestre) de Tonty
Therese de Tonty
Nicholas Constantin del Halle
Cherubin Deniau
Derance
Joseph des Noyelles (or Desnoyelles)
Nicolas Joseph des Noyelles (or Desnoyelles)
Catherine Gertrude (Macard) Deschamps
Genevieve (de Ramezay) Deschamps
Jean Baptist Deschamps
Jeanne Marguerite (Chevalier) Deschamps
Louis Henry Deschamps
Desloriers
Joseph Despre
Michel Dizier (Disier)
du Figuier
Antoine du Fresne
Jacques du Moulin
Pierre du Roy
Salomon Joseph du Vestin
Dugne (Dugue?)
Antoine Dupuis dit Beauregard
Dusable
Pierre Esteve
Catherine Madeleine Fafard dit Laframbois
Pierre Faverau dit LeGrandeur
Antoine Ferron
Franceour
Louis Gastineau
Veron Grandmesnil
Marie Gregoire
Marie Therese (Cadillac) Gregoire
Nicolas Gregoire
Pierre Gregoire
Paul Guillet
Denis Guyon
Elizabeth (Boucher) Guyon

Pierre Hemard
Bela Hubbard
Jolicoeur
Charlotte Francoise Juchereau
Jacques L'Anglois
Paul L'Anglois
L'Arramee
l'Esperance
la Giroflee
Francois La Marque
La Montagne
la Roze
Jean Labatier dit Champagne
Laplante
Jean Laumet
Jean le Blanc
Antoine Le Moine
Charles Le Moine
Francois Le Moine
Gabriel Le Moine
Jacques Le Moine
Jacques Le Moine
Jean Baptiste Le Moine
Joseph Le Moine
Louis Le Moine
Marie Genevieve (de Joybert) Le Moine
Paul Joseph Le Moine
Pierre Le Moine
Rene Le Moine
Charles Le Moine (II)
Marie Le Page
le Pezant (or Pesant)
Pierre Leger dit Parisien
Mackinac
Antoine Magnant
Marie Anne Magnun
Pierre Mallet
Francois Margue
Jerome Marliard
Michael Masse
Mere Minique
Louise (de Marsac) Navarre
Mary (Lootman) Navarre
Robert Navarre
Robert Navarre (II)
Neven
Marie Anne Nivard
Louis Normand
Joseph Parent
Catherine Jeanne (le Moine) Payan
Pierre Payan
Anne (de Corbarboineau) Pean
Ives Jacques Hugues Pean
Jean Pierre Pean
Mare Francoise (Pecody) Pean
Michael Jean Hugues Pean
Antoine Pecody
Jeanne (de St. Ours) Pecody
Pemoussa


Pierre Poirier
Pierre (Louis?) Antoine Potier
Quilenchive
Radisson
Charles Regnault (Renaud?)
Rencontre
Jean Richard
Joseph Rinaud
Pierre Robert
Pierre Roy
Jacques Charles Sabrevois
Jean (Boucher) Sabrevois
Jean Serond
Sirier
Blaise Surgere
Pierre Tacet
Francois Tesee
Antoine Tuffe dit du Fresne
Etienne Venyard
Xaintonge
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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.