People of Detroit

Some of the people of Detroit from 1797 to the present.

James Abbott (II)
Charles S. Adams
James Anderson
John Anderson
Dennis Archer
William Smead Armitage
James A. Armstrong
Adelaide Askin
Absalom Backus
John Judson Bagley
Kirkland Barker
Asher B. Bates
Carleton Abbey Beardsley
Marguerite Beaubien
Thomas Berry
John Biddle
Charles Bowles
Hugh Brady
Calvin Knox Brandon
Philip Breitmeyer
Adelaide Brush
Alfred Brush
Elijah Brush
Christian H. Buhl
Frederick Buhl
Theodore C. Buhl
William Austin Burt
Lewis Cass
Jerome Cavanagh
M.H. Chamberlain
Zachariah Chandler
Marshall Chapin
Daniel Chester
Albert Cobo
George Codd
Levi Cook
Frank Couzens
James Couzens
George de Baptiste
Edwin Denby
Frank Doremus
William C. Duncan
Roman Gribbs
Stephen Benedict Grummond
John H. Harmon
John Harvey
Douglass Houghton
Charles Howard
Henry Howard
Henry Jackson Hunt
Oliver Moulton Hyde
Edward Jeffries
De Garmo Jones
Louis Kamper
Jonathan Kearsley
John Ladue
George C. Langdon
Henry Ledyard
Alexander Lewis
Gordon W. Lloyd
John C. Lodge
Andrew Mack
Joseph Martin
Oscar Marx
Mashaginarabek
William C. Maybury
Merrill I. Mills
Louis Miriani
Hugh Moffat
Frank Murphy
John Patton
Hazen S. Pingree
Zina Pitcher
Augustus S. Porter
John Pridgeon
Richard Reading
H.H. Richardson
William Rickert
Augusto Rivalto
Alexander Hamilton Sibley
Augusta Sibley
Ebenezer Sproat Sibley
Frederic Baker Sibley
Henry Hastings Sibley
Mary Sibley
Sarah Alexandrine Sibley
Solomon Sibley
Leonard Simons
John Smith
Sarah Whipple Sproat
Mark Chancellor Stevens
Frederick Stubbs
William B. Thompson
William G. Thompson
William Thorn
Charles Christopher Trowbridge
Eugene Van Antwerp
James A. VanDyke
George Washington
Salon Weeks
William W. Wheaton
Katherine Whipple
Whitney
John R. Williams
Augustus Brevoort Woodward
Coleman Young
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
Close Help Window

Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.