People of Detroit

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Edward Abbott

Lieutenant

James Abbott

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

James Abbott (II)

Son of James Abbott. Was one of Detroit's first postmasters. Lived in a house that was later the site of the Hammond Building.

Chapman Abraham

First known Jew in Detroit, Chapman was one of the few men who escaped the fort during "Pontiac's War".

William Adair

Nurseryman and landowner.

Charles S. Adams

Husband of Mary Sibley.

Guilleaume Aguet

Held lot #35 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Claude Allouez

Father

Jesuit who was the first known non-Native American to hear of the Mississippi River. Native Americans told him of the great river in 1665.

Jeffrey Amherst

Sir

Governor-general of the British colonies.

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William Ancrum

Major

Twelfth official commandant of British Fort Detroit (1785?-86?).

James Anderson

Architect of Old City Hall

John Anderson

Colonel

Commanded artillery defense of Detroit during the War of 1812 and for the following 21 years.

Colin Andrews

Active citizen in British Detroit in the late 1760's. Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

Charles Anthon

Professor

Son of Genevieve Jadot and George Christian Anthon. An esteemed Greek and Latin scholar.

George Christian Anthon

Doctor

Born: 08-25-1734

German-born garrison doctor at Detroit under British rule.

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Henry Anthon

Reverend

Son of Genevieve Jadot and George Christian Anthon. Rector at St. Mark's in the Bowery.

John Anthon

Son of Genevieve Jadot and George Christian Anthon. A New York attorney.

Dennis Archer

Mayor

68th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1993-2002).

William Smead Armitage

Born: 06-11-1830
Died: 01-28-1887

Son of William and Rosina Armitage. Secretary and treasurer of Detroit's American Glass Plate Company, and later, of Eureka Iron Company, and still later, of Galvin Brass and Iron Works.

James A. Armstrong

Husband of Augusta Sibley.

Arnault

Company of the Colony representative sent with Radisson to take over Fort Ponchartrain.

Adelaide Askin

Daughter of John Askin. Wife of Elijah Brush.

John Askin

Detroit settler. Owner of the Askin farm, which became the Brush Farm when Askin's daughter married Elijah Brush.

Reuben Attwater

Secretary of Michigan Territory

Marie Louisa Augier

1st wife of Philip Dejean.

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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.