People of Detroit

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Jacques L'Anglois

Held lot #15 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Paul L'Anglois

Held lot #47 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

L'Arramee

Held lot #63 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

l'Esperance

A soldier in Cadillac's garrison at Fort Ponchartrain.

Catherine L'Esprit

Wife of Louis Veziere dit Laferte. Daughter of Claude L'Esprit. Owned a farm 2.5 arpents wide on the north side of the Detroit River.

La Barre, Governor of New France

Governor of New France from 1682 - 1684

La Bute

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

la Giroflee

A soldier in Cadillac's garrison at Fort Ponchartrain.

Francois La Marque

One of two men to whom de Tonty gave exclusive trading rights in Fort Ponchartrain.

La Montagne

Held lot #42 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

la Roze

A soldier in Cadillac's garrison at Fort Ponchartrain.

Jean Labatier dit Champagne

Held lot #11 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Dominique Labrosse

Signed a petition supporting the election of Philip Dejean as judge and justice of Detroit.

John Ladue

Born: 1803
Died: 1854

24th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1850-1851); came to Detroit from New York in 1847

Lafleur

Signed a petition supporting the election of Philip Dejean as judge and justice of Detroit.

A. Langan

One of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.

George C. Langdon

Born: 1833

38th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1878-1879)

Emeric Lannoo

Born: 1871
Died: 1957

Emeric LannooEmeric Lannoo was an immigrant from Zwevezele, West Flanders, Belgium. Lannoo owned a farm on the land that currently houses St. John's Hospital and the 7-Mack Shopping Center. Before buying that land, Lannoo owned a farm near Gratiot and 6 Mile. When that area started being developed, he sold the land. A Montgomery Wards store may have been built on that spot. Lannoo also built houses. He died in 1957 in Grosse Pointe Farms.

Jacob Lansing

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

Laplante

A soldier in Cadillac's garrison at Fort Ponchartrain.

Agatha Laselle

Wife of Hyacinthe Reaume.

Jean Laumet, (Sieur de Cadillac?)

Cadillac's father

Jean le Blanc

Born: 1675

AKA: Outoutagan / Ottoutagan / Jean Le Bland. Ottawa Chief.

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Antoine Le Moine

Governor of Cayenne

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Charles Le Moine, Baron de Longueville

Father of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Francois Le Moine, Sieur de Bienville

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Gabriel Le Moine

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Jacques Le Moine

Held lot #65 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Jacques Le Moine, Sieur de Ste. Helene

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Jean Baptiste Le Moine, Sieur de Bienville

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Joseph Le Moine, Sieur de Serigny

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Louis Le Moine, Sieur de Chateauguay

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Marie Genevieve (de Joybert) Le Moine

Wife of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Paul Joseph Le Moine, Chevalier de Longeuil, Sieur de Maricourt

Born: 09-19-1701
Died: 05-12-1778

Tenth official commandant of Fort Ponchartrain

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Pierre Le Moine, Sieur d'Iberville

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Rene Le Moine

Held lot #64 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Charles Le Moine (II), Baron de Longueville

Brother of Paul Joseph le Moine, tenth commandant of Fort Ponchartrain.

Marie Le Page

Held lot #59 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

le Pezant (or Pesant)

Ottawa Chief who was was jailed by Cadillac who then helped him "escape" after an Ottawa attack on a Miami village near Fort Ponchartrain in 1706.

Marie Ann Leclaire

Mother of Louis Veziere dit Laferte. Wife of Pierre Veziere.

Henry Ledyard

Born: 03-05-1812
Died: 06-07-1880

28th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1855-1856)

J.M. Legare

Signed a petition supporting the election of Philip Dejean as judge and justice of Detroit.

Pierre Leger dit Parisien

Held lot #06 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Gabriel Christoph LeGrand, Sieur de Sintre

A notary serving French settlers in British Fort Detroit. He had a reputation for incompetence and didn't hold the job for long. Later he was notary at Kaskaskia where he completed screwed up the land deed records.

J.M. Legras

Citizen of British Detroit.

Richard Beringer Lernoult

Captain

Tenth official commandant of British Fort Detroit (1774-1779).

Alexander Lewis

Born: 10-24-1822

37th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1876-1877)

Gordon W. Lloyd

Architect of Central Methodist Church.

John C. Lodge

Mayor

51st, 54th and 56th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1922-1923, 1924, 1927-1929).

Stephen Lynch

Signed a petition supporting the election of Philip Dejean as judge and justice of Detroit.

Archibald Lyon

One of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.

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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.