People of Detroit

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Andrew Mack

Born: 12-29-1800
Died: 04-03-1883

11th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1834)

Mackinac

Chief

Ojibwa Chief who led an attack on Detroit in 1746.

Alexander Macomb

Son of John Macomb. Brother of William Macomb.

John Macomb

Father of William and Alexander Macomb. Grandfather of General Alexander Macomb.

William Macomb

One of three members of parliament elected in Detroit (late 1790's). The uncle of General Alexander Macomb. The son of John Macomb. Brother of Alexander Macomb. One of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.

Antoine Magnant

Held lot #53 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Marie Anne Magnun

Second wife of Francois Marie Picote de Belestre (II)

Pierre Mallet

Held lot #43 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Manitou

Chief

Ojibwa Chief from the Saginaw area. Attended several peace councils and conference in Detroit (1760; October 17, 1763; July 29, 1765).

Marantet

Signed a petition supporting the election of Philip Dejean as judge and justice of Detroit.

Francois Margue

Held lot #52 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Jerome Marliard

Held lot #48 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Jacques Marquette

Father

Born: 06-10-1637
Died: 05-18-1675

Founded first permanent settlement in Michigan (Sault Ste. Marie). With Joliet, discovered the mouth of the Mississippi River.

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Anderson Martin

One of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.

Joseph Martin

Mayor

53rd Mayor of the City of Detroit (1924).

Oscar Marx

Mayor

49th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1913-1918).

Mashaginarabek

Chief

Ojibwa chief. Lived in a village near Detroit.He signed a deed to William Thorn Junior for land on the east shore of the St. Clair River, August 28, 1798.

Michael Masse

Held lot #17 of the original 68 land grants Cadillac made to private individuals from March 1707 to June 1710.

Robert Matthews

Captain

14th official commandant of British Fort Detroit (1787-1788).

Marie Clemence Maupetit

Along with her husband, Pierre Poirier, Marie was an early settler of Detroit. Moirier was one of the original land grantees. [Special thanks to Annette Sheline (nee Annette Marie Montpetit), a descendent of Maupetit, for this info).]

William C. Maybury

Mayor

45th Mayor of Detroit in (1897-1904).

George McBeath

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

J. McDonnell

One of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.

Allan McDougall

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

George McDougall

Lieutenant

Lieutenant of Detroit garrison in 1768.

Elizabeth McGregor

Wife of Gregor McGregor.

Gregor McGregor

Settler of British Detroit.

Lachlan McIntosh

Signed a petition supporting the election of Philip Dejean as judge and justice of Detroit.

Alexander McKee

Served with Patrick Murray on the land board of the District of Hesse (east side of Detroit River).

J.P. McKinstry

2nd husband of Mary C.A. Williams.

David McLean

One of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.

Richard McNeal

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768. Also signed a petition supporting the election.

Robert McWilliams

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

George Meldrum

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768. Owned Meldrum Farm east of Meldrum Avenue. An ancestor of the Ebert family.

Baptiste Meloche

Farmer on whose land Pontiac and his men camped before attacking Detroit.

Rene Menard

Father

Founded the mission of La Point du saint Esprit on Lake Superior in what is now Wisconsin (1665).

Alexander Mercier

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

Merrill I. Mills

Born: 11-04-1819
Died: 09-14-1882

34th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1866-1867)

Mere Minique

Sorcerer

Fictitious? Psychic who foretold of problems in Fort Ponchartrain (City of Destiny).

Louis Miriani

Mayor

64th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1957-1962).

Hugh Mitchell

Voted in Detroit's first election in 1768.

Hugh Moffat

Born: 1810
Died: 08-06-1884

36th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1872-1875)

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F. Mollere

Active French citizen in British Detroit in the late 1760's.

Charles Moran

Judge

Signed a petition supporting the election of Philip Dejean as judge and justice of Detroit. Later became a judge himself. Father of John V. Moran.

John V. Moran

Son of Charles Moran.

Gershom Mott

Major

Father of Mary Mott.

Mary Mott

Wife of John R. Williams, the City of Detroit's first mayor.

Mumford

Signed a petition supporting the election of Philip Dejean as judge and justice of Detroit.

Frank Murphy

Mayor

58th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1930-1933).

Patrick Murray

Major

Fifteenth official commandant of British Fort Detroit (1788-1790).

Jean Myer

Detroiter who falsely accused Alexis Cuillerier of drowning James Fisher's son in 1763. Myer himself may have murdered James Hill Clark and/or the Fisher child.

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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.