The Streets of Detroit

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B Street
No longer appears on city maps. May still exist.

West of 3100 Vinewood. 1 block south of 3900 Michigan

BachFrederick Bach founded a village in Huron County. This road may have been named for him. It may have been named for the composer. It may have been named for someone/something else.
Bacon Street
Off map
Badger Avenue
Off map
Bagg StreetOriginally known as Arch Street. May no longer exist as either.
Bagley AvenueNamed for Governor John Judson Bagley. Mary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Bagley Avenue commemorates John J. Bagley, who served two successive terms as Michigan governor from 1877 to 1881. Bagley made Detroit a chewing tobacco leader in the 1840s with Mayflower chewing tobacco. He was also the first president of Michigan Mutual Life Insurance in 1867, a bank trustee, and police commissioner in 1865."
Baker StreetOnly a little over a block exists that is still called Baker. The rest of what was Baker is now Bagley.
Baldwin AvenueHenry P. Baldwin was governor of Michigan in 1872. The street may have been named for him.
Balfour Avenue
Off map
Balmoral Avenue/Road
Baltimore Avenue E-WMaybe named for the city in Maryland -- or its namesake.
Banbee Avenue
Bangor AvenueProbably name for Bangor, Maine.
Bank Street
Off map
Banmoor Place
Off map
Barbara Avenue/Street
Off map
Barclay Avenue (Spw)There was a Barclay Lumber Company in Ontonagon County. The name might come from the same source.
Barham Avenue
Off map
Barker StreetPossibly named for Kirkland Barker, 33rd Mayor of the City of Detroit (1864-1865).
Barlow AvenuePossibly named for New York emigrant, Nathan Barlow.
Barlum Avenue
Barnes StreetJohn F Barnes became postmaster in Midland County in 1897. The street may have been named for him.
Off map
Barr StreetPossibly named for Free Press associate, Robert Barr.
Barrett Street
Barrie Avenue (Spw)
Barron StreetBarron St was named after the Barron family (1702) who owned a large section of land in Springwells. Joseph Barron was the first Justice of the Peace for Springwells. His son built several houses in the area which are still standing to this day.
Off map

Special thanks to Joseph Barron's great-great-great-great-grandson Joseph Calamia for this information.

Barry StreetPossibly named for Michigan Governor John S. Barry (1842-1846).
Bart
Bartholomaei
Bartlett Avenue (HP)Wayland W. Bartlett was a postmaster in Grand Traverse County. I'm not sure if there is a connection.

Highland Park

Barton PlaceFrank Barton was an early settler of Alcona County. I do not know if the street was named for him.
Basil Avenue/Street
Off map
Bassett AvenuePossibly named for Major Henry Bassett, Ninth official commandant of British Fort Detroit (1772-1774).
Off map
Bates StreetThomas T. Bates was secretary of the Traverse City railroad company. It is not clear to me whether or not there is a connection between Thomas and Bates Street. Frederick Bates was the first postmaster of Detroit. It is probably more likely that the street was named for him than for Thomas, but again, I don't know.
Battelle
Baubee Avenue
Bauman Avenue
Baxter Street
Baylis Street
Bayonet Street
Bayside Avenue
Off map
Beacon StreetMay or may not have some connection to Boston's Beacon Hill.
Beaconsfield AvenueMay or may not have some connection to Boston's Beacon Hill.
Off map
Beals Avenue
Beamen Street
Beard Avenue
Beatrice Avenue
Off map
Beaubien StreetNamed for the Beaubien family and their farm, which was bordered by Beaubien Street. Mary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Beaubien and St. Antoine originated from the two Beaubien brothers, Lambert and Antoine, each of whom received half of the family farm after the death of their father, Jean Baptiste Beaubien, one of the first white settlers on the river, opposite Fort Dearborn. Lambert was a colonel in the First Regiment of Detroit's militia. He fought in the War of 1812. Antoine chose to name his property after his patron saint, St. Antoine. Antoine was a lieutenant colonel in the Michigan Territorial Militia. He donated a chunk of his land for the Sacred Heart Academy, once located at the corner of Jefferson and St. Antoine."
Beaufait StreetNamed for the Beaufait family who owned land, possibly a ribbon farm, in Detroit.
Beaufield
Beaumont Avenue
Off map
Beaver StreetI would venture to guess that this street was named for the animal known as the beaver. Beaver pelts were a prized commodity in the area for a while.
BeaverlandI would venture to guess that this street was named for the animal known as the beaver. Beaver pelts were a prized commodity in the area for a while.
Off map
Bedford CourtMay be named for Bedford, New York.
Bedford RoadMay be named for Bedford, New York.
Off map
Beech StreetNamed for a forest tree of Michigan
Beechdale AvenueWas probably named for the beech tree or Henry Ward Beecher.
Beecher StreetNamed for Henry Ward Beecher
Off map
Beechton AvenueWas probably named for the beech tree or Henry Ward Beecher.
Beechwood AvenueWas probably named for the beech tree.
Begole Avenue
Beierman
Beland Avenue/Street
Belden AvenueProbably named for Francis J. Belden.
Belfast AvenueProbably named for the city in Ireland.
Belle AvenueBelle Isle was named for Isabelle Cass, the daughter of General Lewis Cass. It is possible that Belle Street has the same origin.
Belleterre Avenue
Bellevue Avenue
Belmont Avenue
Belmont Avenue (Ham)
Belton Avenue/Street
Belvidere Avenue
Benard
Benham Avenue
Beniteau Avenue
Off map
Benlow Court
Bennett Avenue/StreetPossibly named for Thomas Bennett, Thirteenth official commandant of British Fort Detroit (1786).
Benson StreetSwan Benson was a postmaster in Wexford County. It is possible that the street was named for him.
Bentler Avenue/Street
Off map
Benton StreetPerhaps named for the Missouri Senator (great uncle of the artist of the same name), Thomas Hart Benton, or not...
Berden Street
Off map
Berdeno
Beresford Avenue (HP)

Highland Park

Berg Road

Off map

Berkley Road
Berkshire Avenue (Spw)Berkshire is a breed of swine; but the street was probably named for Berkshire County, England.
Berkshire RoadBerkshire is a breed of swine; but the street was probably named for Berkshire County, England.
BermudaProbably named for the British Territory of Bermuda.
Bernard Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Berres Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Berry AvenuePossibly named for John G Berry. It is more likely, I think, that it was named Joseph H. Berry and/or his brother, Thomas and/or Joseph's daughter, Alice Berry Lodge.
Bertha
Bertrum
Bessemore Avenue

Off map

Best
Bethlawn
Bethune Avenue E-W
Beverly Court
Bewick Avenue
Beyer Street
Biddle AvenueProbably named for John Biddle, 4th Mayor of the City of Detroit (1827-1828).
Billet Street
Biltmore Avenue/Street

Off map

Binder Avenue
Bingham StreetProbably named for governor Kingsley S. Bingham.

Off map

Bingham Street (Spw)Probably named for governor Kingsley S. Bingham.
Birch Avenue/StreetProbably named for the birch tree.

Off map

Birchcrest DriveProbably named for the birch tree.
BirminghamProbably named for the town in England.
Birwood Avenue
Bishop RoadPossibly named for congressman Roswell p. Bishop.

Off map

Bismark Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Bivouac Street
BlackburnMaybe named for slaves, Thornton Blackburn and his wife. I don't know if this is the case.
Blackett
BlackmarPossibly named for A.T. Blackmar who owned a sawmill
Blackmoor Avenue/Street

Off map

Blackstone Avenue
Blaine Avenue
Blair Avenue
Blake Avenue
Bland Avenue (Spw)
Bleser Avenue (Spw)
BlissProbably named for Governor Aaron T Bliss.
Bloody RunName given to Parent's Creek in 1763 after 160 British soldiers died their during Pontiac's War.
Bloom Avenue
Bloomfield Road
Blowers Avenue
Blue Hill Avenue
Blythe Avenue/Street
Boes Alley
Boleyn Avenue/Street
Bonaparte AvenueProbably named for Napoleon Bonaparte.
Bonita Avenue
Bordeau Avenue
Bortle Avenue
Boston AvenueNamed for the City of Boston in MA
Boston Boulevard E-WNamed for the City of Boston in MA
Bostwick StreetNamed after James Bostwick, land owner
Bosworth Court
Botsford Street (Ham)

Hamtramck

Boulder Avenue
Boulevard Court
Bourke Avenue
Boxwood AvenueProbably named for the tree or shrub.
Boyd Street
Brace Avenue/Street
Braden Avenue
Bradford Avenue
Bradley Avenue
Brady StreetMay be named for General Hugh Brady.
Braile Avenue
Brainard StreetNamed for Martha Brainard-Spencer, the wife of General Joseph Spencer and grandmother of Mrs. Lewis Cass
Bramell Avenue
Bramford Street
Brandon Avenue
Brandt Avenue (Spw)
Brayton Avenue
Breckenridge AvenueNamed for Vice President John C. Breckenridge
Breeze Avenue
Bremen Avenue
Brennan Avenue
Brentwood
Brentwood Avenue E-W
Bretton Drive
Brevoort PlaceNamed for Judge Augustus Brevoort Woodward OR H.J.B. Breevort, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Brewster Street
Briarcliff Avenue
Brighton Avenue (HP)

Highland Park

Brimson Avenue
Bringard Drive
Brinker Avenue
Brinker Street
Brinket Avenue
Bristol Avenue/Place
Bristow Avenue
Britain Avenue
Broadstreet Avenue
Broadway
Brock Avenue
Brockton Avenue/Street
Brombach Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Bromley Avenue
Brooklyn AvenueProbably named for Brooklyn, NY.
Brooks (Brookes) Avenue
Brow Street
Brown PlaceProbably named for Dr. William Brown, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Bruce Avenue
Bruckner Avenue
Brunswick Avenue
Brush StreetNamed for Elijah Brush's farm (originally the Askin farm belonging to John Askin). Mary Bailey of the Detroit News writes, "Brush was named after Edmund Askin Brush, son of Elijah Brush, who was a leading lawyer and Detroit's second appointed mayor. Brush Street was also the Brush property boundary. Edmund studied law, as did his father before him. He was Secretary to the Governor and judge of the Michigan Territory in 1823, a private secretary to Lewis Cass in 1826, a court recorder, a member of the City Planning Commission and a police commissioner. "
Bryan Avenue (Spw)
Bryant AvenueNamed for the aunt of W.B. Wesson
Bryden Avenue
Bryson Avenue
Buchanan StreetNamed for President James Buchanan
Buckingham Road
Buelow Court
Buena Vista Avenue E-W (HP)May be named for an American victory at Buena Vista, Mexico in 1847. Or maybe just because of a nice view.

Highland Park

Buffalo Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Buhl AvenueNamed for Christian Buhl, 31st Mayor of the City of Detroit (1860-1861).
Buhr Avenue
Bulwer Avenue
Burchill Court
Burdeno Street
Burger Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Burgess Avenue
Burke Avenue
Burlage Place
Burley Avenue (Spw)
Burlingame Avenue
Burlington Road
Burnette AvenueProbably named for James Burnett, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Burns Avenue
Burns Drive
Burnside AvenueNamed for Civil War General Ambrose Burnside.

Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

Burnside Avenue (Spw)
Burrell Place
Burroughs AvenuePossibly named for Clyde Burroughs of the DIA.
Burt Avenue
Burt Court
Burt Road
Burton AvenueMight have been named for Detroit historian, Clarence Monroe Burton.
Burwell Avenue
BushThere was a Detroit Tiger (1906) named Donie Bush. I don't know if the street was named for him. Probably not.
Bushey StreetNamed for Joseph Bushey, land owner
Butler Avenue (Ham)Named for Milton H. Butler, land owner

Hamtramck

Butternut StreetNamed for the tree indigenous to Michigan. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Butternut Street in Detroit is near Poplar, Ash, Pine, Spruce, Magnolia, Mulberry, and Sycamore Streets.
Byron Avenue
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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.