The Streets of Detroit

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C Street
No longer appears on city maps. May still exist.

West of 3100 Vinewood. 1 block south of 3900 Michigan

Cabacier's CreekCabacier was the name of one of Detroit's original ribbon farmers. See also May's Creek
Cabot Avenue
Cadet Avenue
Cadieux Avenue
Cadillac AvenueNamed for the founder of Detroit, Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac.
Cadillac BoulevardNamed for the founder of Detroit, Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac.
Cadillac SquareNamed for the founder of Detroit, Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac.
Caely Avenue
Cahalan Avenue
Cairney Avenue
Caldwell AvenueThomas T. Caldwell (Missaukee County) and James C. Caldwell (Quilna Township Postmaster) both figure into Michigan history. Quilan Township was renamed Caldwell Township (1873) for Thomas. Perhaps the street got its name from one of these men -- or the township (if the street was named after 1873).
Calhoun Avenue (Spw)
California Avenue (HP)Probably named for the state.

Highland Park

Calumet AvenueA calumet is the name of the clay stone bowl in some Native American peace pipes.
Calvert Avenue
Cambridge AvenueCould be named for Cambridge Township or Cambridge, England or neither.
Cambridge RoadCould be named for Cambridge Township or Cambridge, England or neither.
Cambridge Road N-SCould be named for Cambridge Township or Cambridge, England or neither.
Camden StreetCamden in Hillsdale County was named for Camden, NY (Michigan Place Names). Camden Street may get its name from the town in Hillsdale, the town in New York, the district in London, Camden Yard, or none of the above.
Cameron Avenue
Camille Street
Camley Street
Campau Street N-SNamed for the Campau family ribbon farm.
Campau's RiverSee May's Creek
Campbell AvenueCampbell in Ionia County was named for Irish immigrant brothers Jeremiah and Martin Campbell (Michigan Place Names). There may or may not be a connection here.
Campbell Avenue N-SCampbell in Ionia County was named for Irish immigrant brothers Jeremiah and Martin Campbell (Michigan Place Names). There may or may not be a connection here.
Campus Martius
Candler Avenue (HP)

Highland Park

Canfield Avenue E-WJohn and Roswell Canfield began a settle in Manistee County called Canfield Mill Settlement (Michigan Place Names). The name may come from them/there.
Caniff Avenue
Canonbury Street
Canterbury Avenue (Spw)Perhaps named for the place in England.
Canterbury RoadPerhaps named for the cathedral city in England.
Canton Avenue
Canyon
Capitol Avenue
Carbon StreetCarbon in Saginaw County was named because the region was heavy with coal mining (Michigan Place Names). Not sure if that means anything for this street.
Carbondale AvenueCarbondale in Menominee County was named because of its charcoal kilns (Michigan Place Names). Not sure if that means anything for this street.
Cardoni Avenue
Carlbert Avenue
Carleton AvenueMay have been named for George W. Carleton. Or it may have been named for Michigan poet, Will Carleton (1845-1912)(Michigan Place Names).
Carlin Street
Carlisle Street
Carman Avenue
Carmel Avenue
Carol Street
Caroline Street
Carpenter AvenueNamed for Carpenter Creek and the Carpenter family (early farmers).

Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

Carrie Avenue
Carson AvenueMay be named for Carson City, Nevada. Could also be named for Arthur Carson (for whom Carsonville in Sanilac County was named; Michigan Place Names)
Carten/Carton Avenue
Carter Avenue
Cartridge Avenue
Cary Street
Cascade AvenueCascade in Kent County was named for ''the fine fall of water.'' (Michigan Place Names). I don't know if that can apply here or not.
Casgrain Avenue
Casino
Casmere Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Casper Avenue
Cass AvenueNamed for Lewis Cass.
Mary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Like a number of other streets located west of Woodward, Cass was once a farm boundary line. The Lewis Cass farm, purchased from the Macomb family, was one of the largest Detroit farms, the width of Cass to Third Street and north from the Detroit River to Grand Boulevard in length. The 500 acres bought for $12,000 and the subsequent growth of Detroit made Cass a very wealthy man.

Cass came to Detroit as a schoolmaster in the early 1800s and became a lawyer, a colonel in the militia, and a general in the U.S. Army.

In 1813 President James Madison appointed Cass the second governor of the Michigan territory, a post he held for 18 years. He became a U.S. Senator from Michigan in 1845. In 1848 he ran for president as a Democrat, but lost to Whig Zachary Taylor. He served in the Senate until 1857 and was President James Buchanan's Secretary of State.

Cass Street was located immediately west o
Castle Avenue
Castle Avenue (Spw)
Castleton AvenueCould be named for Castleton in Barry County.
Cathedral Avenue
Catherine Street
Cavalry Avenue N-S
Cecil AvenueCould be named for Cecil in Emmet County.
Cedar AvenueProbably named for the Cedar tree.
Cedargrove AvenueProbably named for the Cedar tree.
Cedarhurst AvenueProbably named for the Cedar tree.
Cedarlawn AvenueProbably named for the Cedar tree.
Celeron AvenueProbably named for Celeron de Blainville. Celeron Island is named for him. The French sent him to protect their claims in the Ohio Valley in 1749. He became a commandant at the fort. Alternate spelling is Celoron.
Celestine

Named for Celestine Young (brother of Frank X. Young; grandfather of Jeffery T. Young; and great-uncle of Thomas Constance).

In or around 1853, Nicholas Young purchased a large amount of land in Detroit in the area of what is now Celestine and Young Streets. Nicholas divided the land between his children (including his son, Stephen).

Stephen Young's great-grandson, Jeffery Young writes, ''I believe that Celestine Street was named for my grandfather Celestine Young (Stephen's son and Thomas Constance's great uncle.) The story goes that my grandfather, Celestine approx. 8 years old at the time, was standing at the corner of Young Street and a cross road that was under construction when he overheard the workers stating that they didn't have a name for the new street. He then said 'How about Celestine?' and the name stuck.''

Jeffery sent this photo of his father, Celestine Charles Young, standing at the intersection of Celestine and Young in June of 2014.

Celestine Charles Young

Special thanks to Jeffery T. Young and Thomas Constance for providing this information.

Celia Street
Center Line RoadNamed by the French because it was the middle one of three Native American trails leading from Fort Ponchartrain to trading posts in the north.
Central AvenueProbably named for marking the center of something.
Centre/Center StreetProbably named for marking the center of something.
Chadwick StreetChadwick in Ionia County was named for Charles Chadwick (Michigan Place Names). This street may or may not have been named for the man or the town.
Chalfonte AvenueNamed after a French Lieutenant Chalfonte in the French garrison posted at Fort Ponchartrain, back around the 1750s, when the Canadian Governor was offering free land to anyone who would settle in Detroit.

Special thanks to Larry Topping who learned this story from his mother. Larry adds, ''Now, I don't know if this story is true or not, but it's the only story I've ever heard about the name origin of Detroit's Chalfonte Avenue. ''

Chalmers Avenue N-S
Chamberlain AvenueChamberlain in St. Joseph County was named for Francis J. Chamberlain, its first postmaster (1842)(Michigan Place Names). I don't know if the street shares this namesake.
Chandler AvenueMary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Chandler is the namesake of Senator Zachariah Chandler, a leading merchant, former mayor of Detroit (1851) and founder of the Republican party. The Detroit News building on Lafayette was built on the site of his former home."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Chandler Avenue (HP)Mary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Chandler is the namesake of Senator Zachariah Chandler, a leading merchant, former mayor of Detroit (1851) and founder of the Republican party. The Detroit News building on Lafayette was built on the site of his former home."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Chandler Park DriveMary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Chandler is the namesake of Senator Zachariah Chandler, a leading merchant, former mayor of Detroit (1851) and founder of the Republican party. The Detroit News building on Lafayette was built on the site of his former home."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Chapaton StreetThe Chapatons or Chapotans were early Detroit landowners (possibly ribbon farmers) and this street's namesake/s.
Chapel Avenue
Chapin StreetChapin in Saginaw County was named for township organizer, Austin Chapin (Michigan Place Names). Chapin Lake in St. Joseph County was named for settler, David Chapin (Michigan Place Names). The street may or may not have been named for the township, the lake or one (or both) of the men.
Charest Avenue(Ham)Possibly named for a Civil War General.

(Hamtramck) Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

Charlemagne AvenueProbably named for the Roman Emperor.
Charles StreetAccording to Michigan Place Names, there are several ''Charles'' who gave their names to Michigan places. There was lumberman Charles F. Read (Mackinac County); Jacob Charles (Cass County); postmaster Charles M. Nichols (Kalamazoo County). This street could be named for any of these men or places, or something completely different.
Charleston AvenueAccording to Michigan Place Names, there are several ''Charles'' who gave their names to Michigan places. There was lumberman Charles F. Read (Mackinac County); Jacob Charles (Cass County); postmaster Charles M. Nichols (Kalamazoo County). This street could be named for any of these men or places, or something completely different.
Charlevoix AvenueNamed for Father Pierre Francis Xavier Charlevoix.
Charlotte AvenueCharlotte in Eaton County was named for the wife of Edmond Bostwick (Michigan Place Names). I don't know if this street has any connection to the town or the woman.
Chartier Avenue (Ham)
Chase Road (Spw)Joseph Chase was the first postmaster in what became Chase's Corners in Oakland County (Michigan Place Names). There may or may not be a connection here.
Chase StreetJoseph Chase was the first postmaster in what became Chase's Corners in Oakland County (Michigan Place Names). There may or may not be a connection here.
Chatfield Street
Chatham Avenue/StreetChatham in Alger County was named for Chatham, Ontario (Michigan Place Names). I don't know if the street has any connection.
Chatsworth Avenue/Road
Chelsea AvenueChelsea in Washtenaw County was named for Chelsea, Massachusetts (Michigan Place Names). This street was likely to be named for one of the towns.
Chene StreetNamed for the Chene family ribbon farm.
Chenlot Avenue/Street
Cherokee DriveWell, probably named for the Native American Nation.
Cherry StreetNow known as ''Kaline Street'' for Tiger great, Al Kaline. When it was Cherry Street, it was probably named for the cherry tree.
Cherrylawn AvenueProbably named for the cherry tree.
Cheshire Avenue/StreetProbably named for Cheshire, England.
Chesterfield RoadMay have been named for Chesterfield in Macomb County.
Chestnut StreetProbably named for the chestnut tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Chestnut Street in Detroit is near Maple Street.
Cheyenne Avenue/StreetProbably named for the Native American Nation/tribe.
Chicago AvenueProbably named for Chicago, Illinois.
Chicago BoulevardProbably named for Chicago, Illinois.
Chipman Place/Street
Chippewa Avenue/StreetI'm guessing this was named for the Native American Nation/tribe.
Chope Place
Chopin AvenuePerhaps named for composer, Frederic Chopin.
Christiancy StreetProbably a religious thing.
Christopher Avenue (Ham)
Christy Avenue
Church Street
Church Street (HP)

Highland Park

Church Street (Spw)
Churchill AvenueThere was once a church that sat on a hill... Just kidding. I don't know...
Cicotte StreetPerhaps named for Springwells, Michigan born baseball player Eddie Victor Cicotte.
Ciliax Street
Cincinnati StreetProbably named for the town in Ohio.
Civic Place
Clairmount Avenue
Clairpoint/e Avenue N-S
Clairview Avenue
Clarendon AvenueClarendon in Calhoun County was named for Clarendon, New York. The street may have been named for one of these places.
Clarion AvenueClarion in Charlevoix County was named for Clarion, Pennsylvania. The street may have been named for one of these places.
Clarita Street
Clark AvenueClark City in Monroe County was named for postmaster, Justus Clark. I don't know if there is a connection.
Clark Avenue SClark City in Monroe County was named for postmaster, Justus Clark. I don't know if there is a connection.
Clark CourtClark City in Monroe County was named for postmaster, Justus Clark. I don't know if there is a connection.
Clarkdale AvenueClark City in Monroe County was named for postmaster, Justus Clark. I don't know if there is a connection.
Clay Avenue/Street
Clayburn Street
Clayton Avenue
Clements Avenue
Cleveland Avenue/StreetMay be named for Cleveland, Ohio (which is named for General Moses Cleaveland) or may be named for President Grover Cleveland. If you find out when the street was named, that might help eliminate one or both of these possibilities.
Cleveland PlaceMay be named for Cleveland, Ohio (which is named for General Moses Cleaveland) or may be named for President Grover Cleveland. If you find out when the street was named, that might help eliminate one or both of these possibilities.
Cliff Avenue
Clifford StreetMary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Clifford has a bit of humor attached to its name. Thomas Cliff owned the only home in this area of the city and ran a tavern where the David Whitney Building now stands. A creek crossed the road near the tavern and overflowed onto the road in the spring. When the festive set of Detroit wanted some merry-making, they usually went up to Cliff's place and crossed over the creek by means of stepping stones. When the roisterers returned they had great difficulty keeping on the stones, so they would return to town wet to their knees (sometimes even elbows). The townspeople referred to the crossing as "Cliff's ford." It first appeared on a map published by John Farmer in 1835."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Clifton Avenue
Clinton Street
Clippert Street
Clough Street
Cloverdale Avenue
Cloverlawn Avenue
Clyde Avenue
Cobalt Street
Cobb PlaceNamed for Ty Cobb.
Codding Street
Cody Avenue
Coe Street
Colburn Place
Colby Street
Coleman Avenue (Spw)
Colfax Avenue
College Avenue/Street
Collingham Drive
Collingwood Avenue
Collins Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Colonial Avenue
Colorado Avenue (HP)Named for the state of Colorado.

Highland Park

Colton Avenue
Columbia Avenue E-WMary Bailey of the Detroit News writes: "John R, Elizabeth and Columbia streets are named for personal reasons. John R. Williams was a landowner , merchant and bank president in the first half of the 19th century, who named the street after himself. Baptized John Williams, he adopted the letter 'R' to distinguish himself from another John Williams in Detroit. Some of his business ventures, such as publishing an early newspaper, included his uncle, Joseph Campau. Williams was a general in the Territorial Militia, a member of the board of trustees at the 'new' University of Michigan and the first elected Detroit mayor in 1824. Williams named Elizabeth after his daughter, and Columbia after a street where he lived in Albany, New York."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Columbus AvenueProbably named for Christopher Columbus.
Commercial Street
Commonwealth Avenue
Commor Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Compass Avenue
Comstock Avenue (Ham)Probably named for Michigan Governor William Comstock.

Hamtramck

Conant Avenue
Concord Avenue
Conger Avenue
Congress Street E-WMary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Congress was named in honor of the 1826 Congress. In that year, Congress granted to Detroit the military reserve through which the street ran."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Conley Avenue
Connecticut Avenue (HP)Named for the state?

Highland Park

Connors/Conner Avenue
Connors/Conner Lane
Conrad Street
Constance Avenue
Continental Avenue N-S
Conwar Place
Conway Avenue
Cook Street
Cooley StreetProbably named for Thomas F. Cooley, Chief Justice of the Michigan Supreme Court.
Coolidge HighwayProbably named for President Calvin Coolidge.
Coon Avenue
Cooper CourtNamed for barrel makers everywhere... Maybe.
Cooper StreetNamed for barrel makers everywhere... It turns out that's probably not the case. A man named Cooper owned a farm in the area in the 1830s It is believed that the street was named for him.

Special thanks to Robert Lessnau for sharing this information. Robert received the information from Mr. Cooper's great-grandson.

Cope Avenue
Copland Avenue N-S
Coplin Avenue N-S
Coram Street
Corbett Avenue
Corbin Avenue
Cordell Street
Cordova Avenue
Corey Street
Cornell Avenue
Cornwall Avenue
Cortland Avenue (HP)

Highland Park

Cottage Grove Avenue (HP)

Highland Park

Cotterell Avenue
Coulter Avenue (Spw)
Council Street (Ham)

Hamtramck

Courville Avenue
Coventry Avenue
Covert Avenue
Covington Drive
Coyle Avenue
Craft Street
Craig Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Craig Street
Crane Avenue
Cranshaw Avenue
Crawford Avenue
Crawford Street S
Cresswell Street
Crocuslawn AvenueA lawn full of crocus is a lovely sight in spring.
Cromwell Avenue
Cromwell Street
Cross Street
Crossley Street S
Crowley Avenue
Crown
Crudder Avenue
Crusade Street
Cruse Street
Crystal Street
Cullen AvenueDon't even go there...
Culver Avenue
Culver Avenue (Spw)
Cumberland Avenue/Way
Curt Street
Curtis Avenue
Curwood
Cushing Avenue
Custer Avenue
Cutler Street
Cypress/Cyprus StreetProbably named for the tree (cypress) or the sovereign state (Cyprus).
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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.