The Streets of Detroit

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D Street
No longer appears on city maps. May still exist.

West of 3100 Vinewood. 1 block south of 3900 Michigan

Da Costa Avenue
Dailey Avenue
Dailey Court
Dakota Avenue E-W
Dale Avenue
Dale Street (Spw)
Dallas Street
Dalrymple Street
Dalzelle Street
Dan Avenue
Danbury Avenue
Dane Street
Danforth Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Daniels Avenue
Darcy Place
Dartmouth Avenue
Darwin Street
Davenport Avenue
David Avenue
Davie Avenue (Spw)
Davis Place
Davison Avenue E
Davison Avenue W (HP)
Dawes Street
Dawson Avenue
Dayton Street
De Buel Avenue
De Soto/a Avenue
Deacon Street
Dean Avenue
Dearborn Avenue
Dearing Avenue
Decatur Avenue
Defer PlacePossibly named for George Defer.
Dehner Avenue
Delaware AvenueNamed for the state of Delaware.
Delmar Avenue
Delray Street
Delta Avenue
Deming Street
Denmark Avenue
Dennis Street
Dennison Street
Denton Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Denver Street
Depot Esplanade
Dequindre StreetNamed for the Dequindre family ribbon farm.
Derby Avenue
Desgrandchamp Avenue
Desmond Avenue
Desner Avenue
Detloff Court
Detroit Street
Detwiler Avenue
Devereaux StreetNamed for former Red Wing, Boyd Devereaux -- just kidding.
Devine Avenue
Devon Avenue
Devonshire RoadProbably named for the county in England.
Dewey Avenue
Dexter Avenue
Dexter Boulevard
Dey Street N-S
Dickerson Avenue N
Dill Place
Dinser
Distel Street
Diversey Avenue
Division Street
Dix Avenue (Spw)
Dix Avenue N-S
Dobel Avenue
Dodge Avenue
Dolan Street
Dolphin Street
Dolson Street
Domine Avenue
Donald Avenue (Spw)
Donald Place
Dora StreetDora Street was named for the daughter of Anton Kaier (see Kaier Street and Flora Street).

Special thanks to Anita Hiltz, granddaughter of Anton Kaier, for this information.

Dorchester Street
Doremus Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Doris Avenue
Doris Avenue (HP)
Dorothy Avenue
Dorset Street
Dort Street
Dover Avenue
Downing Avenue N-S
Doyle Avenue
Dragoon Avenue
Dragoon Avenue S
Drake Street
Dresden Avenue
Drexel Avenue (Spw)
Drexel Avenue N-S
Drifton Avenue
Driggs Street
Drydock Street
Drysdale Avenue (Spw)
Duane Avenue
Dubay Avenue
Dublin Street (Ham)
Dubois Street
Duchess Avenue
Duffield Street
Dumbarton/Dunbarton Avenue
Dumfries Avenue
Duncan Street
Dundee Avenue
Dunedin Avenue
Dunkirk AvenueLikely named after the Flemish North Sea Port in France

David Baeckelandt (former President and Chairman of the Board of the Gazette van Detroit - the last bilingual Dutch-English Belgian newspaper in North America)

Dunn Road
Dupont Avenue S
Duprey Street
Durand Street
Durham Place
Dwight Avenue
Dwyer Avenue
Dyar Street (Ham)

Hamtramck

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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.