The Streets of Detroit

This section of the site is not complete. If you have a question about a street that is not listed, please email .

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Hackett Street
Hafeli Place
Hague Avenue
Hale Street
Hall Place
Hall Street
Halleck AvenueNamed for Civil War General Henry Halleck.

Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

Halley Avenue
Hamburg Avenue
Hamilton Avenue
Hamilton Road
Hamlet Street
Hammond Street
Hampshire StreetProbably named for Hampshire County in England.
Hampton Avenue
Hancock Avenue E-WHancock is a very common street name, probably referring to John Hancock.
Hanley Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Hanna Avenue
Hanover Avenue
Hanson Street
Harbaugh Street N-S
Harbor Street
Harding AvenuePossibly named for President Harding.
Hardyke Street
Harlow Avenue
Harmon Avenue
Harned Avenue
Harnor Court
Harold Avenue (Ham)
Harper Avenue
Harper Court
Harrell Avenue
Harrington Street N-S
Harrison Avenue
Harry Street
Hart Avenue
Hartford Avenue
Hartwell Avenue
Hartwick Street
Harvard Avenue
Harvard Place
Harvard Road
Harvey Street
Hasse Avenue
Hastings Street
Hathon Avenue
Havana AvenueProbably named after Havana, Cuba.
Haverhill Road
Hawthorne Avenue
Hayes AvenueCommon street name. Probably named for President Rutherford B. Hayes.
Haynes Avenue
Hazel StreetProbably named for the hazel tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Hazel Street in Detroit is near Butternut, Ash, Pine, Spruce, Magnolia, Mulberry, Elm, and Sycamore Streets.
Hazelridge Avenue
Hazelton Avenue
Hazelwood Avenue
Hazlett Avenue
Healy Avenue
Hearn Avenue
Heck Place
Hecla/Helca Street
Hedge Street
Heidelberg Street
Heidt Avenue S
Heintz Avenue
Helen Avenue
Hemlock Avenue
Henderson AvenueProbably named for David Henderson, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Hendricks Street
Hendrie Avenue
Henley Place
Henrietta Place
Henry StreetA small portion of the I-75 service drive is known as Henry St. The rest was taken out by the freeway.
Herbert Street
Hereford Street
Herkimer Street
Herman Avenue
Hern Street
Hershey Avenue
Hesse StreetThis street was most likely named for Hugo J. Hesse. He and real estate business partner Walter C. Piper were early settlers of Warren, Michigan. Their company was called Piper-Hesse. The two platted many of the streets in Warren and named them after automobiles.

Special thanks to Suzette deBeaubien Brown, granddaughter of Hugo J. Hesse, for this information.

Hessel Avenue
Hewitt Avenue (Ham)

Hamtramck

Heyden Avenue
Hibbard Avenue
Hickory Avenue
Hickory Street
Hicks Street
High Street E-W
Highfield Avenue
Highland Avenue (HP)

Highland Park

Highland Place
Hildale Avenue E-W
Hill Street (HP)

Highland Park

Hillger Avenue
Hillsboro Avenue
Hillview Avenue
Hindle Street
Hinkley Place
Hobart Street
Hobson Street
Hogarth Avenue
Holborn Avenue
Holbrook Avenue
Holcomb Avenue
Holden Avenue
Holly Street
Hollywood Avenue E-W
Holmes Avenue
Holmes Avenue (Ham)
Holmur Avenue
Home Street
Homedale Street
Homer Avenue
Homestead Street
Honorah Avenue
Hooker Avenue
Hoover Avenue
Horatio Street
Horger Avenue
Horton Avenue
Hosmer Street
Houghton Avenue
House Street
Houston Avenue
Howard Street
Howe Court
Howell Street
Hoyt Street
Hubbard AvenueNamed for the Hubbard family ribbon farm.

Thanks to Bernice Malinowski!

Hubbell Avenue
Huber Street
Hudson Avenue
Hughes Avenue
Hughes Terrace
Hull Avenue
Humboldt Avenue
Humphrey Avenue
Hunt Street
Huntington Avenue
Huntington Road
Hurlbut Avenue
Huron Street
Hussar Street
Hyacinth Avenue
Hyde Street
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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.