The Streets of Detroit

This section of the site is not complete. If you have a question about a street that is not listed, please email .

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Mabel Avenue (HP)
MacCrary Street
Mack AvenueNamed for Mayor Andrew Mack (1834) -- or not... Wikipedia says that it was named for John M. Mack, who was a supervisor of Hamtramck.
Mackay Avenue (Ham)
Mackenzie Avenue
Mackie Street
Mackinaw Avenue
Macomb StreetNamed for early Detroiter, Alexander Macomb and his family. Mary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, ''Macomb owes its name to the Macomb family, one of Detroit's earliest settlers. They owned large parcels of land and at one time owned Hog Island, later named Belle Isle.'' in ''City of Destiny,'' George Stark writes that several places in the area were named after thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812. William Macomb was one of the thirty.
Macon Street
Maddelein Street
Maderia Avenue
Madison Avenue
Madola Avenue
Magdelein Street
Magnolia StreetProbably named for the magnolia tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Magnolia Street in Detroit is near Butternut, Ash, Poplar, Spruce, Magnolia, Mulberry, and Sycamore Streets.
Maiden Avenue
Maine AvenueNamed for the state of Maine.
Majestic Avenue
Major Avenue
Malcolm Avenue
Mallina Street
Malvern Street
Manchester Avenue (HP)
Mandalay Avenue
Mandale Avenue
Manderson Road
Manhattan Avenue (Ham)
Manila Street
Manistique Avenue N-S
Manning Avenue
Manor Avenue
Mansfield Avenue
Manson Street
Mansur Street
Manuel Street
Maple StreetProbably named for the poplar tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Maple Street in Detroit is near Chestnut Street.
Maplelawn Avenue
Mapleridge Avenue
Mapleview Street
Maplewood Avenue
Marantette/Marentette Avenue
Marbud Avenue
Marcelle Place
Marcus Avenue
Marcy Court
Marene Street
Margaret Avenue E-W
Margareta Avenue
Marian Place
Marietta Street
Marion Street
Marjorie Street
Mark Street
Mark Twain AvenueNamed for Edgar Allen Poe. Well, seriously - who wouldn't know this street was named for Mark Twain?
Market Street
Marlborough Avenue N-S
Marley Street
Marlowe Street
Marne Avenue
Marquette AvenueProbably named for Father Jacques Marquette, the French Jesuit and explorer.
Marquette DriveProbably named for Father Jacques Marquette, the French Jesuit and explorer.
Marseilles AvenueProbably named for the French city of Marseilles.
Marsh Street
Marshall Avenue S
Marston Avenue
Martin PlaceMay have been named for the Martin family or St. Martin family -- both were ribbon farmers. Anderson Martin was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Seems to have been taken out for the construction of part of the Medical Center.
Martin StreetMay have been named for the Martin family or St. Martin family -- both were ribbon farmers. Anderson Martin was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Martindale Avenue N-SNamed for Detroit schools Superintendent Wales C. Martindale, who was in charge in the early 1900s. He was the man who started Cass Tech.

Special thanks to Dann Austin (Buildings of Detroit) for ths information.

Marx AvenueKarl Marx? The Marx Brothers?
Marygrove Avenue
Maryland Avenue
Mason Avenue/PlaceNamed for Steve T. Mason, first Governor of Michigan

Special thanks to Gary E. Schlinkert for correcting this oversight!

Massachusetts Avenue (HP)
Mather Avenue
Mathews Street
Maxwell Avenue
May Street
May's CreekNamed for James May. Originally the creek was called Campau's River; then Cabacier's Creek for Joseph Cabacier.
Maybury Grand Avenue
Maydale Avenue
Mayfield Avenue
Maynard Street
Maywood Avenue
McArthur Place
McBrearty Place
McBride Place
McClellan Avenue
McCormick Street
McDonald Avenue
McDonald Place
McDougall AvenueNamed for the Civil War General, Clinton(?) McDougal (MacDougal?).

Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

McGraw Avenue
McGregor Street
McIntyre Avenue
McKinley Avenue
McKinney Avenue
McKinstry Avenue
McKinstry Avenue S
McLean AvenueProbably named for David McLean, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
McLean Avenue (HP)Probably named for David McLean, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
McMillan Avenue
McNichols Road E-W
McPherson AvenueNamed for Civil War General, James McPherson.

Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

McQuade Avenue
Meade Avenue
Meadowbrook Avenue
Meadowdale Street
Meadowpark
Mecca Street
Mechanic Street
Medbury Avenue
Medina Street
Melbourne Avenue
Meldrum AvenueNamed for James Meldrum's farms which was on the east side of Meldrum Avenue.
Meldrum CourtNamed for James Meldrum's farms which was on the east side of Meldrum Avenue.
Mellon Avenue
Mellow Avenue
Melrose Street
Melville Street
Melvin Street
Memorial Avenue
Mendota Avenue
Mercier Street
Merkel Street
Merlin
Merrick Avenue
Merrill Avenue
Merritt Avenue
Merton Road
Merwin Avenue
Metropolitan Avenue
Mettetal Avenue
Metzger Avenue (D-HP)
Meuse Street
Meyers Road
Miami Avenue N-SNamed for the Miami people (a Native American nation or tribe).
Michigan AvenueBegan as a Native American hunting/travelling path.
Middle Street
Middlepoint Avenue
Midfield Street
Midland Avenue (HP)
Midway Avenue
Milbank Avenue
Miles Street
Milford Avenue
Military Avenue N-S
Miller Avenue
Miller Court
Milner Avenue
Milo Street
Milton Avenue
Milwaukee Avenue E-WNamed for the city of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Minden Avenue
Minerva StreetMinerva is the Roman Goddess of wisdom, invention and the arts. This street may or may not be named for her.
MinneapolisNamed for the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Minnesota Avenue E-WNamed for the state of Minnesota.
Minnie Street
Minock Street
Mint Street
Missouri AvenueNamed for the state of Missouri.
Mitchell Avenue
Modern Avenue
Moenart Avenue
Moffat Avenue
Mogul Street
Mohawk Street
Mohican Street
Molena Avenue
Monarch Street
Monica Street
Monitor Avenue
Monnier Road
Monnig Court
Monroe AvenueProbably named for President James Monroe.
Montague Avenue
Montana Avenue E-WNamed for the state of Montana.
Montcalm Street E-W
Montclair Avenue
Monte Vista Avenue
Monteith Street
Monterey Avenue (HP)
Montgomery Avenue
Montlieu Avenue
Montrose Avenue
Montville Place
Moon Avenue
Moore Place
Moran AvenueCould be named for Charles Moran, a judge in British Detroit; or for his son John V. The Moran family probably owned a ribbon farm. Or for a Civil War General.

Special thanks to John Bezik for the Civil War information.

Morang AvenueNick Morang grew up on the east side of Detroit about a half mile south of Morang Dr. The street, like many in Detroit, was named for a family that owned much of the nearby land. Nick's grandfather, James Morang owned much of the property near Whittier and Kelly (the Kelly family also owned land in the area; Kelly Road was once known as Pumpkin Hook Road). James' farmhouse stood on land that was later home to a Kroger (the Kroger is no longer there).
MoravianMoravian in Clinton Township was named after missionaries who settled near Mount Clemens in the late 1700s. The Moravians were evicted from settlements in Ohio and charged by British authorities with being sympathetic to the American cause.

(Information courtesy of Frank DeFrank with the Macomb Daily and Robert Szudarek)

Morgan Street
Morley Avenue
Morrell Avenue
Morrell Avenue S.
Morrow Avenue/Circle
Morrow Street
Morse AvenuePossibly named for morse code inventor Samuel Morse.
Morton Street
Moss Avenue (HP)
Motor Boat Lane
Mound Avenue/RoadNamed for a large, ancient Native American burial (and ceremonial?) mound located in an area near the road.
Moyes Avenue/Street
Mt. Clemens Drive
Mt. Elliott Avenue
Mt. Elliott Court
Mt. Olivet
Mt. Vernon Avenue
Muirland Avenue
Mulberry StreetProbably named for the mulberry tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Mulberry Street in Detroit is near Butternut, Ash, Pine, Spruce, Magnolia, Poplar, and Sycamore Streets.
Mulford Place (HP)
Mullane Street
Mullett StreetNamed for the famous hockey hair cut -- just kidding. Probably named for early Detroit landowner John Mullett.
Muncy/Muncey Street
Munich AvenuePossibly named for the German city of Munich.
Murat Street
Murray Hill
Murray Street
Musket Street
Myrtle StreetMyrtle Street was probably named for the myrtle tree, however, it is now named for Martin Luther King Jr (it has been renamed MLK Jr Blvd).
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
Close Help Window

Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
Close Help Window

Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.