The Streets of Detroit

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Pacific AvenueNamed for the ocean?
Packard AvenueProbably named for the Packard Motor Company.
Page StreetThis street could have been named for original Detroit land grantee Marie Le Page.
Pallister Avenue
Palmer Avenue E-W
Palmetto Avenue
Palms StreetPalm Street is named after Francis Palms, the largest individual landowner in Detroit (and possibly the whole Northwest Territory) in the 1830s. Palms was originally fro Antwerp, Belgium.

Special thanks to David Baeckelandt (former President and Chairman of the Board of the Gazette van Detroit - the last bilingual Dutch-English Belgian newspaper in North America) for this information.

Panama AvenueProbably named for the country of Panama.
Parent's CreekNamed for Joseph Parent, an original Detroit land grantee.
Park AvenueMary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Park Avenue received its name in 1835 because of its starting point at Grand Circus Park."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Park Drive
Park Grove
Park Place
Park Street
Park Terrace
Parkdale Terrace
Parker Avenue
Parkhurst Avenue
Parkhurst Place
Parkinson Street
Parkland Avenue
Parkside Avenue
Parktrail
Parkview Avenue
Parkview Drive
Parkwood Avenue
Parsons Street
Pasadena Avenue (HP)
Patricia Avenue
Patton AvenueNamed for General Patton?
Paul Street
Paulus Avenue
Payton Avenue
Pear StreetCould be named for the pear trees planted by Cadillac in honor of King Louis of France.
Pearl Avenue
Pease Avenue
Peck
Peerless Street
Pelham Avenue N-S
Pelkey Street
Pelouze Street
Pembroke Road
Pennington Drive
Pennsylvania Avenue
Penrod Avenue
Penrose Avenue
Peoria Avenue
Pepper Road N-S
Is now known as Outer Drive.
Pere Street
Perkins Street
Perry Street
Pershing Avenue
Peter Hunt Street
Peter Smith Avenue
Peterboro Street
Peters Avenue
Peterson Street
Petoskey AvenueProbably named for Michigan's state rock, the Petoskey stone.
Petoskey Road
Pfent Street
Phelps Street
Philadelphia Avenue E-WProbably named for Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Philip Avenue
Phyllis Street
Picadilly Road
Pickford Avenue
Piedmont Street
Pierce Street
Pierson Street
Pilgrim Avenue (HP)
Pine StreetProbably named for the pine tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Pine Street in Detroit is near Butternut, Ash, Poplar, Spruce, Magnolia, Mulberry, and Sycamore Streets.
Pinehurst Avenue
Pinewood Street
Pingree AvenueNamed for former Detroit Mayor, Hazen Pingree.
Pingree SquareNamed for former Detroit Mayor, Hazen Pingree.
Pioneer
Piper AvenueThis street was most likely named for Walter C. Piper. He and real estate business partner Hugo J. Hesse were early settlers of Warren, Michigan. Their company was called Piper-Hesse. The two platted many of the streets in Warren and named them after automobiles.

Special thanks to Suzette deBeaubien Brown, granddaughter of Hugo J. Hesse, for this information.

Piquette Avenue
Pitcher StreetI don't find this on any map. But it supposedly replaced Ann Street in 1887.
Pitkin Street (HP)
Pitt AvenueProbably named for William Pitt.
PittsburghNamed for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Plainview Avenue
Plainview Road
Platt Street
Playfair Avenue (Ham)
Plaza Street
Pleasant Avenue
Plum Street
Plumer Street
Plymouth Avenue/Road
Poe Avenue
Pointcettia Avenue
Pointer
Poland Avenue (Ham)When the Dodge Brothers built the Dodge automobile assembly plant in Hamtramck in 1910, the availability of jobs drew a large number of Polish immigrants to Hamtramck. The city's population grew from 4500 people in 1910 to 56,000 people by 1930 -- most of them Polish. Poland Ave was name for the country of Poland as a result.

Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

Pollard StreetPossiby named for Rev. Richard Pollard.
Pomona
Ponchartrain Drive WNamed for Louis (or Jerome) Ponchartrain, Minister of Marine at the court of King Louis of France. Also the name of Detroit's first settlement (Fort Ponchartrain du Detroit).
Pontiac StreetNamed for Ottawa Chief, Pontiac.
Poplar StreetProbably named for the poplar tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Poplar Street in Detroit is near Butternut, Ash, Pine, Spruce, Magnolia, Mulberry, and Sycamore Streets.
Port Drive
Port Lagoon
Portage Avenue (HP)
Porter StreetPossibly named for Michigna Territory Governor George B. Porter.
Portlance Avenue
Portland Street
Posen Street
Post Street N-S
Poupard Avenue
Powell Avenue
Prairie Avenue
Prentis Avenue
Prescott Avenue (Ham)
Pressler Avenue
Prest Avenue
Preston Street
Prevost AvenuePossibly named for Antoine François Prévost, the author of the novel Manon Lescaut.

Special thanks to John Jamieson, a one time resident of Prevost Avenue, for this information.

Princeton Avenue
Proctor AvenuePossibly named for General Henry Proctor.
Promenade Street
Prospect Avenue (HP)
Pryor Avenue
Pulaski StreetNamed for a prominent Polish family.
Pulaski Street (Ham)Named for a Polish Revolutionary war general of Polish decent

Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

Pulford AvenuePulford street was named after Lorenzo Lloyd Pulford (a nephew of Gen John Pulford; and a real estate developer in the late 1800's).

Special thanks to Tad Pulford for this information.

Purdue Avenue
Puritan Avenue (HP)
Putnam Avenue
Putt Street
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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.