The Streets of Detroit

This section of the site is not complete. If you have a question about a street that is not listed, please email .

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Saginaw Street
Salem Avenue
Saliotte Avenue
Sallan Street
Salter
Sampson Street
San Juan Drive
Sanders Avenue
Sanford Avenue
Sanger Avenue
Sanilac
Santa Barbara Drive
Santa Clara Avenue
Santa Maria Avenue
Santa Rosa Drive
Saratoga Avenue
Sarena
Sargent StreetPossibly named for Northwest Territory secretary Winthrop Sargent.
Sarsfield Avenue
Sarvis Street
Sauer Street
Savage
Savannah Avenue E-W
Savery Street
Savoy Street
Sawyer AvenuePossibly named for newspaper man and Young Men's Society President, Franklin Sawyer.
Saxon Avenue
Scarsdale Avenue
Schaefer Highway
Schaeffer Highway S
Scheffer Place/Street
Schiller Street
Schley Street
Schoenherr AvenuePossibly named for Michael W. Schoenherr, Detroit's first movie manager.
School AvenueMaybe it led to a school.
Schoolcraft AvenueProbably named for explorer, Henry R. Schoolcraft.
Schroeder Avenue
Schuper StreetSchuper Street no longer exists, but when it did it was the 'shortest' (in distance) of any 'named' road in the entire City of Detroit. It connected Lakepointe to Barham (East Side between Chandler Park and E. Warren). It was named after the family that owned the lot. The city asked if they could purchase back the property to build the road. It was necessary because the homes on Barham (South Side) looked across the street at the garage(s) for the Homes that were on Maryland Road. Barham was the only street in Detroit that was a 'mistake' in planning (not enough property for homes on both sides of the street), so Schuper was created to accommodate the garbage trucks that started there route on Lakepointe.

Thanks to Leif A. Woodhouse, who provided this information in memory of Lawrence and Margueritte Merrill of 5230 Lakepointe, Detroit, MI 48224.

Scott StreetPossibly named for William M. Scott, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Scotten Avenue N-SScotten Ave was named after Daniel Scotten, a capitalist in the tobacco trade, not a builder (as previously reported on this site). Scotten owned a factory at Fort and Clark streets. Scotten owned Dillion-Scotten Tobacco, as well as, Hiawatha Tobacco.

Special thanks to Robert Andersen for providing this information.

Scovel Place
Scripps AvenueProbably named for James Edmund Scripps who founded The Evening News, which later became The Detroit News.
Secor Place
Seebaldt Avenue
Selden Avenue
Selkirk Avenue
Seminole AvenueMany streets in Indian Village have Indian names, yet according to Nick Sinacori, quoted in an article in ModelD, at modeldmedia.com by Rodd Monts, two streets Iroquois and Seminole were named for top-performing race horses and Waterloo was named not after the battle, but for a horse farm of the same name in the area. Read more about this...

Special thanks to Craig Sasser for this information. Read more from Craig here.

Semloh Street
Senator Avenue
Seneca Avenue
Seward AvenuePossibly named for New York Senator, William H. Seward.
Seyburn Avenue
Seymour Avenue
Shady Lane
Shady Lane Court
Shaftsbury Avenue
Shakespeare Street
Sharon Street
Shaw Street
Sheehan Avenue
Sheffield Road
Shelby StreetMary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Fort and Shelby streets were named after Fort Shelby, which was located there. The western point of Fort Street was opened and named in 1827 when the remains of Fort Shelby were razed. The fort was named after Gov. Isaac Shelby of Kentucky, who aided Michigan in the War of 1812 with troops from his home state. "

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Sherbourne/Shelbourne Road
Sheridan Avenue
Sherman StreetPossibly named for Detroiter Abner Sherman; or Civil War General William T. Sherman.
Sherwood Street
Shields Avenue
Shipherd Avenue
Shipherd Court
Shirley AvenuePossibly named for Governor William Shirley of Massachusetts.
Shoemaker Avenue
Short Avenue
Shrewsbury Road
Sibley StreetProbably named for Judge Solomon Sibley.
Siebert
Signet Avenue
Silver Street
Simms Avenue
Simon K StreetNamed for Father Simon Kilar, founder of Transfiguration Catholic Church.

Special thanks to John Bezik for this information.

Sioux
Sire Street
Sirron
Sloan Avenue
Sloman Street
Smart AvenueProbably named for Robert Smart, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Smith Avenue
Smith Avenue (Ham)
Snowden AvenuePossibly named for grist mill owner, George Snowden.
Sobieski AvenueNamed for a prominent Polish family.
Sobieski Street (Ham)
Solvay Street N-S
Somerset Drive
Sorrento Street
South Dearborn
South Street
Southampton Avenue
Southern Avenue
Southfield Avenue
Southfield Road
Sparling Avenue
Sparta Avenue
Spaulding CourtThis street was named in honor of J. Miles Spaulding who owned an excavation and road supply company in Detroit. He built the the Spaulding Court Apartments in North Corktown/Briggs (one of 30 buildings he owned). Spaulding Court is the only of his buildings still standing.

Google Books
Google Books

Special thanks to Liam Collins of Wayne State University for this information.

Spence Avenue
Spencer AvenueProbably named for Joseph Spencer, who was one of thirty leading Detroit citizens deported by General Proctor for criticizing the General's actions during the War of 1812.
Spokane Avenue
Sprague Street
Spring Garden Avenue/Springarden Road
Spring Street
Springfield Street
Springle Avenue
Springwells Avenue N-S
Sproat Street
Spruce StreetProbably named for the spruce tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Spruce Street in Detroit is near Butternut, Ash, Pine, poplar, Magnolia, Mulberry, and Sycamore Streets.
St. Agnes Court
St. Albertus Place
St. Antoine StreetMary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "Beaubien and St. Antoine originated from the two Beaubien brothers, Lambert and Antoine, each of whom received half of the family farm after the death of their father, Jean Baptiste Beaubien, one of the first white settlers on the river, opposite Fort Dearborn. Lambert was a colonel in the First Regiment of Detroit's militia. He fought in the War of 1812. Antoine chose to name his property after his patron saint, St. Antoine. Antoine was a lieutenant colonel in the Michigan Territorial Militia. He donated a chunk of his land for the Sacred Heart Academy, once located at the corner of Jefferson and St. Antoine."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

St. Aubin AvenueNamed for the St. Aubin family ribbon farm.
St. Clair AvenuePossibly named for soldier Arthur St. Clair.
St. CyrilNamed after the Catholic Church built in 1925 by Father Zalebera. Formerly was known as Centerline.

Special thanks to Rudy Werner for this information!

St. David
St. Hedwig Street
St. Ignace Court
St. James
St. Jean Avenue
St. John Street
St. Josafats/Josephat Street
St. Joseph Street
St. Lawrence Avenue
St. Louis
St. Martin's AvenueMay have been named for the St. Martin family -- ribbon farmers.
St. Martin's RoadMay have been named for the St. Martin family -- ribbon farmers.
St. Mary's Avenue
St. Patrick Avenue
St. Paul Avenue
St. Stephen's Avenue
St. Thomas Avenue
Stahelin Street
Stair Street
Standish Street
Stanford Avenue
Stanley Avenue
Stansbury AvenuePossibly named for Lieutenant Dixon Stansbury.
Stanton AvenueNamed for General Henry Stanton
Starboard Drive
Starboard Lagoon
Stark Avenue/Street
State Fair Avenue E-W
State StreetMary Bailey of the Detroit News, writes, "State Street was named in 1835, the year the State of Michigan was organized. The capitol was on the street until 1847, when it was moved to Lansing."

http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=199#ixzz0qOP2Vxki

Stawell
Ste. Anne Street
Stearns AvenuePossibly named for business man, Frederick Stearns.
Steel Avenue/Street
Steger Court
Stegner
Steiner Avenue (Ham)
Stender Avenue
Sterling StreetPossibly named for James Sterling, interpreter in early Detroit.
Sterritt Avenue
Stevens Avenue (HP)
Stimson Avenue
Stocker Avenue
Stockton Avenue
Stockwell
Stoepel Avenue
Stoepel Place
Stone Street
Stotter Avenue
Stout Avenue
Stovels Place
Strasburg Avenue
Stratford Road
Strathcona Drive
Strathmoor Avenue/Street
Strathmore Road
Stratmann
Stratton Street
Strong Avenue
Stuart Street
Sturgis
Sturtevant
Suffolk
Summitt Street
Summitt Street S
Sumner Street
Sumpter Avenue
Sunderland Road
Sunnyside
Sunset Avenue
Sunset Place
Superior Street
Sussex Street
Suzanne
Swain Avenue
Swain Avenue S
Swift Avenue
Sword Street
Sycamore StreetProbably named for the sycamore tree. It is common for areas in cities to have streets named after trees. Sycamore Street in Detroit is near Butternut, Ash, Pine, Spruce, Magnolia, Mulberry, and Poplar Streets.
Sylvan Street
Sylvester Avenue
Syracuse Avenue
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Glossary:
Algonquin

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes (and others): Delaware, Fox, Huron, Miami, Ojibwa (Chippewa), Ottawa, Potawatomi, Sac, Shawnee and Winnebago.
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Glossary:
arquebus

A 39 pound (approximate) musket that two men would prop on a tri-pod and fire with a small torch. The arquebus was used by Champlain's men against the Iroquois to defend the Hurons. This may be the cause of decades of Iroquois abuse of the Hurons.
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Glossary:
clay and wattle

Building technique used in the construction of chimneys in the early days of Fort Ponchartrain. The technique involved piling sticks and packing them - inside and out - with clay and mud.
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Glossary:
Colbertism

Name for early French mercantilism in America, which Jean-Baptiste Colbert was influential in developing.
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Glossary:
conges

Trade permits issued by the Canadian government/court of France in the late 1600s to early 1700s.
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Glossary:
coureurs de bois

Very early French inhabitants of the current US and Canada who gave up their farmsteads for lives in the fur trade. They often lived with Native Americans.
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Glossary:
District of Hesse

Land district provisioned by the Canadian Council on July 24, 1788. The area was on the east side of the Detroit River.
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Glossary:
Fox

"Properly ""Mesh-kwa-ki-hug"". Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Renyard. An allied tribe of the Sacs and Mascoutin."
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Glossary:
Huron

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Iroquoian

General term sometimes used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cayuga, Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, and Seneca.
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Glossary:
Iroquois

"A Native American tribe known for antagonizing and brutalizing the Hurons (see also arquebus)"
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Glossary:
Mascouten

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes and Sacs. Also spelled Mascoutin.
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Glossary:
Miami

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Muskhogean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek.
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Glossary:
New York Currency

First standard currency used in Detroit (first used in 1765).
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Glossary:
Ottawa

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Outagamies

Native American tribe living in the Grand Traverse Bay area at the time Detroit was founded. An allied tribe of the Foxes (and Sacs?).
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Glossary:
Plains Indians

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Apache, Arapaho, Cheyenne, Comanche, Kiowa, and Pawnee (Pani).
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Glossary:
Potawatomi

A Native American tribe that built a village near Fort Ponchartrain.
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Glossary:
Quebec Act

Act of June 22, 1774, in which British Parliament decides to exercise English law in criminal cases and old French provincial law in civil cases in western settlements. The idea was to discourage people from settling in the west.
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Glossary:
Renyard

See Fox
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Glossary:
ribbon farms

Original land grants given by Cadillac. The lots were typically around 200 feet wide at the river front, with lengths up to 3 miles.
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Glossary:
Sac

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sakis

See Sauk
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Glossary:
Sauk

Native American tribe living in the area between Saginaw Bay and Thunder Bay at the time Detroit was founded. The French called the tribe Sakis; English and Americans generally call them Sacs. An allied tribe of the Foxes/Renyards and Mascouten.
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Glossary:
Shoshonean

General term used to describe Native Americans of the following tribes: Bannock and Shoshone.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Montreal

Treaty ending the war between the Iroquois and France and England. Negotiations began in July of 1698 and the treaty was signed in August of 1701.
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Glossary:
Treaty of Ryswick

September 20, 1697 treaty ending war between France and England.
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Glossary:
voyageurs

Early French explorers who traveled mainly by water.